become a member join our mailing list
 
Personal tools
Log in

What are High Conservation Values?

HCVs are biological, ecological, social or cultural values which are outstandingly significant or critically important at the national, regional or global level.

All natural habitats possess inherent conservation values, including the presence of rare or endemic species, provision of ecosystem services, sacred sites, or resources harvested by local residents. There are six categories of HCVs: 

HCV1

HCV 1

Concentrations of biological diversity including endemic species, and rare, threatened or endangered species, that are significant at global, regional or national levels.
HCV2

HCV 2

Landscape-level ecosystems and mosaics. Intact forest landscapes and large landscape-level ecosystems and ecosystem mosaics that are significant at global, regional or national levels, and that contain viable populations of the great majority of the naturally occurring species in natural patterns of distribution and abundance.

HCV3

HCV 3

Rare, threatened, or endangered ecosystems, habitats or refugia.
HCV4

HCV 4

Basic ecosystem services in critical situations, including protection of water catchments and control of erosion of vulnerable soils and slopes. 
HCV5

HCV 5

Sites and resources fundamental for satisfying the basic necessities of local communities or indigenous peoples (for livelihoods, health, nutrition, water, etc...), identified through engagement with these communities or indigenous peoples.

 

HCV6

HCV 6

Sites, resources, habitats and landscapes of global or national cultural, archaeological or historical significance, and/or of critical cultural, ecological, economic or religious/sacred importance for the traditional cultures of local communities or indigenous peoples, identified through engagement with these local communities or indigenous peoples.

© HCV Resource Network 2005–2018
Our policies | Privacy | Disclaimer | This site uses cookies Read more | Admin

2015 CG Identification Thumb